Native of Sumba

Sumba island

Sumba island

Like the proverbial nation of Indonesia: every field has a type of grasshoppers and every pond has a type of fish. Each region has its own uniqueness that is disaggregated into a community. The difference is not to dispute, but it is the culture of a nation’s wealth.

Nusa Tenggara (Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Flores, Timor, Sumba) - a part of Indonesia

Nusa Tenggara (Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Flores, Timor, Sumba) – a part of Indonesia

Similarly with Sumba, which has a wealth of natural beauty and unique culture and exotic. As one of over 300 ethnic groups cultures in Indonesia, Sumba has differences with some places in Indonesia, though having the same geographical groove; Lombok, Sumbawa, Timor, Bali and Flores.

 

 

 

 

 

Nature

Fauna

Sandalwood

conformation :

small head, short neck, long, straight back, high-set tail, thin legs

colour :

all colours

height :

13.1 hands (134.62 cm)

uses :

racing, riding

As one of eight Indonesia breeds native, the Sandalwood is named for the sweet-smelling wood that is the principal export of the islands of Sumba and Sumbawa, and it is Lndonesia’s quality riding pony with little of the Mongolian characteristics found in her other breeds. The Dutch imported Arab stallions to Sumatra, the biggest of the Indonesian islands, and selected native mares were sent to the studs, with their resulting offspring dispersed among the other islands to improve existing stock.

Sandalwood horse

Sandalwood horse

Indeed, the Arabian influence is clear in the Sandalwood, in his chiselled, elegant head, deep chest and girth, and good legs and feet. He has also inherited the Arab’s immunity to extreme heat – the Sandalwood hardly ever breaks sweat and his speed and grace.

Swift and agile, the Sandalwood is often used for racing, both on the islands and in Thailand, to which he is a popular export. In Indonesia itself, the pony is raced over distances of 4-5 km (2.5-3 miles), ridden bareback and in the traditional bitless bridle. In Malaysia, Sandalwoods are crossed with Thoroughbreds to produce a bigger, faster equine, also popular in other Southeast Asian countries. But his willingness and kind nature also make the purebred Sandalwood an excellent child’s pony.

Sumba boobook

Conservation status

Near Threatened (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Strigiformes
Family: Strigidae
Genus: Ninox
Species: N. rudolfi
Binomial name
Ninox rudolfi
Meyer, 1882

 

Sumba Boobook (Ninox rudolfi)

The Sumba boobook (Ninox rudolfi) is a species of owl in the Strigidae family. It is endemic to Sumba in the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests as like at near in Lewa. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Sumba buttonquail

Conservation status

Vulnerable (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Gruiformes
Family: Turnicidae
Genus: Turnix
Species: T. everetti
Binomial name
Turnix everetti
Hartert, 1898

Sumba buttonquail (Turnix everetti)

The Sumba buttonquail (Turnix everetti) is a species of bird in the Turnicidae family. The scientific name commemorates British colonial administrator and zoological collector Alfred Hart Everett.

Distribution and habitat

It is endemic to the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia. Its natural habitats are dry savanna, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, and arable land. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Sumba hornbill

Conservation status

Vulnerable (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Coraciiformes
Family: Bucerotidae
Genus: Rhyticeros
Species: R. everetti
Binomial name
Rhyticeros everetti
Rothschild, 1897
Synonyms

Aceros everetti

Sumba hornbill (male)

Aceros everetti (female)

The Sumba hornbill (Rhyticeros everetti) is a large bird in the Bucerotidae, or hornbill family. The scientific name commemorates British colonial administrator and zoological collector Alfred Hart Everett.

 Contents

 1 Description
2 Distribution and habitat
3 Behaviour
4 Status and conservation
5 References

Description

It is a medium-sized, blackish hornbill, approximately 70 cm long. The male is dark reddish-brown on the crown and nape, with a paler neck. The female has entirely black plumage. Both sexes have a large, dull, yellowish bill with a maroon patch at the base, a serrated casque, and an inflatable blue throat.

Distribution and habitat

An Indonesian endemic, the Sumba hornbill inhabits semi-evergreen forests of Sumba in the Lesser Sunda Islands. It is uncommon and found in the lowlands at altitudes of up to 950 m (3,120 ft).

Behaviour

The Sumba hornbill is a monogamous species. Its diet consists mainly of fruits.

Status and conservation

Due to ongoing habitat loss, limited range, small population size and overhunting in some areas, the Sumba hornbill is assessed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix II of CITES. Part of its habitat is protected in the Laiwangi Wanggameti National Park and the Manupeu Tanah Daru National Park.

 Fauna

Culture

 

 

 

2 Responses to Native of Sumba

  1. Before sumba was nammed the sandal wood island.

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